Your Questions About Financial Freedom University

Steven asks…

careers which one is the best? nursing, law, or education?

I’m 21 years old, a college senior soon to graduate, double majoring in psychology/anthropology. My freshman year, I intended to be a biology major with hopes medical school. I had difficulties adjusting to college life/dorming, and as a result my grades suffered tremendously. After that I transfered, with the bio hopes still intact. But at that university, I didn’t feel I was challenged enough. So I transfered back to my original college, just a different campus….where I picked up my grades and hopefully, I’ll be graduting with a 3.5+. I’m a Psychology/Anthropology major, because I really didn’t know what else to major in. I grew tired of Biology, and science and I realized I did not have the dedication for the medical school route. I’ve always been interesed in humans, how we think, our cultures, our origins, etc. But now I feel like these majors, in todays world, are somewhat irrelevant.
I really wish that I had chosen a program when I had applied to college. I could have graduated next year with a masters and bachelors together, had I enrolled into some type of program.

Now I think that my plan is to take a year off after graduation and try to find a job to pay back some of my loans from school and to gain some experience.

I’m really thinking between three possible career paths, but I have different considerations that I’m kind of confused with. These are teaching, nursing, and law.

I do substitute teaching now, and I really enjoy the school setting and elementary kids. I’ve also worked at some summer camps, and I just love kids. It never feels like a job at all, and I feel very young at heart. But my dad is a high school teacher, and he’s kind of deterring me from the teaching setting…he says its difficult work and not so respected as much as it deserves to be.

The next possible choice is nursing. Nursing is also demanding, and not as respected as it deserves to be. Honestly, nurses are the ones who do all the dirty and hard work. Doctors come in for a few minutes, but nurses are the ones who do pretty much all else. I could enter a program and turn my bachelors into a BSN in nursing in around a year or two. I’m also an EMT and a very nurturing and patient person. If I did nursing, I’d love to work with neonates or pediatrics. But I tend to get easily intimidated by people of a higher authority—like doctors and such. And i’m kind of beyond the whole science route….but nursing can be rewarding, healthcare promises job stability, and the money is good.

Finally, I’ve been considering law. I think I can be very persuasive and an adept writer. I love to read and write, and if I entered law, once again, I’d want to work on behalf of children’s rights, and women’s rights.

Some of my considerations before picking a possible career are that, I still live at home. At this point in my life, I’m feeling very grateful but stifled living at home…and I really wish to get out into the world on my own. But I think if I got into law school, I’d have to live at home for 3-4 years. I’m not sure a teacher’s salary would give me the financial freedom I need to pay back my school loans and live at home, and I’m not sure if I can snap back so easily into science after studying the humanities for so long…my mind has kind of switched gears…but if i settled into nursing, I’m very studious and committed so I can do it.

I’ve been in school for my entire life, with no breaks in between. Graduate school is an eventual plan, for sure. I’m planning to take a year off to really think about what I want to do, because up until now, I’ve always been indecisive and changing my mind. I really want to make sure that I’ve figured everything out, instead of going to grad school for teaching for example, and then deciding I want to do law.

Any suggestion would be greatly welcome and appreciated. Especially from teachers, nurses, and those in the law setting. Thank you!!!

John answers:

With what you have done already (skimming the lengthy above), teaching sounds like a good progression for you. Law would require a huge time & financial commitment and law school is really gruesome. Nursing would require also some back tracking and dedication again as well and more science. You really are pretty scattered however in what you want–perhaps you should take advantage of some of the services that your college offers for career counseling and try & sort it ll out so you do not keep jumping from one to another.

Charles asks…

Honestly….can i achieve what i want ?

hi im 23 years old.
my goal is to achieve financial freedom asap (ie. not working but with a decent passive income)
after highschool I started working as a carpenter because its what i enjoy though music is my true passion…i did not go to university simply because i didnt think it was neccessary to achieve what i wanted…also my family was pretty poor even still..

i work and work…and also saving up the money i have left over from my pay cheques…
recently ive been researching…readin books …talking to people about inventing, business, etc

my plan is to keep saving money until i have a decent amount…then start doing smart investments and/or a business..
i cant keep working or ill never retire young.

I’m willing to bust my butt to achieve this
any advice ?
any books or sites you recommend..

keep in mind im still very new to this whole “finance” thing

John answers:

Start Reading and researching. You will need to accumulate a minimum of three million dollars to provide a decent income and protect against inflation

Mandy asks…

What if my boyfriend doesn’t share the same goals in life as I do?

My boyfriend and I are both in our mid to late 20’s. We have been dating for 6 months and have known each other for nearly a year. Recently we started discussing our goals in life.

He has dabbled in many college degrees (3-4) but has never completed any of his programs and currently works in a supermarket. He works the evening shifts so I never really get to see him since I am at school during the day and he is at work at night. We don’t live together so we see each other once a week, if even. He hates his job and wants to move on again but this time he wants to find a job working as cabin crew on a plane because he doesn’t like being tied down and wants to travel and see the world. I think it’s great that he has this job goal (even though it means that I will see him even less than I already do) but he doesn’t want to make a career out of it either.

So I asked him about his goals in life and he told me that he doesn’t like school and thinks it’s a waste of time. He doesn’t have any career goals either and just wants to work different jobs so he doesn’t get bored. His goals in life are very simple: he just wants to have a roof over his head and to be happy. I asked him if he wanted his own house and he said no, he’s fine with just renting.

I was very shocked when I heard about his goals and ambitions or rather, lack of. I find myself to be very different from him as I am nearly finished my university degree in a professional program and plan to find a job in my field when I graduate. I want to have a respectable career, my own house and car — just a nice comfortable life with financial freedom.

I don’t think his plans in life are realistic and think that he just doesn’t really know what he wants to do yet. How do I try to help him realize his goals? Do you think we are too different and that there is no future for us?

John answers:

Though his goals are lofty, are they realistic and do you think he will follow through with them? The alternative to that is, does he have flights of fancy about how he’ll support himself, that ultimately don’t pan out?
If he’s a couch potato and doesn’t make much effort to carry his own weight, you might have a problem. On the hand, if he gets by, even if his direction seems shiftless at the moment; you have to ask yourself, can the two of you find a balance or is this going to be a problem down the road?

When the time comes when you decide to buy a home and you want him to come with you, the burden of the mortgage payments and cost of living for the two of you wont be entirely shouldered by you, would it? Without downplaying the living arrangement the two of you would have; his paying his share of things wouldn’t be unlike paying his share of the rent. While he may not be interested in actively seeking out and purchasing a home, when that time comes, he probably wouldn’t take issue living there with you. You need to discuss it more with him to be sure, but he may not care where he lives, so long as you’re there with him.

All that you can offer him is your presence and support; be there for him whenever he needs, whether it’s so he has someone that will hear him out when he wants to vent about his job, or when he needs advice about what he wants to do next.
And if and when he decides he needs a more concrete direction in life, you be there for him too.
But while you’re being there for him don’t forget, support isn’t a one way street. You’re a person too and you’re bound to have fair share of problems that you’ll need his support.
Support each other, grow together and never take each other for granted; those are some of the most important things needed for a lasting relationship.

Mary asks…

What do you guys think of my plan ????? any advice will be appreciated?

ok so im 22 right now and after highschool i tried to pursue a musical career because thats my passion…it didnt work out because it was quite difficult…thats not to say im giving up (im still playing with band, gigging every once in a while)…anways

needless to say i never went to university..its not my thing anyways
my plans right now is to become a salesperson because these past few months ive been very intrigued by it…
not sure what type of sales i wanna do yet but my main goal is to TRY and gain experience and support myself for now..

after i have experience in the field and have a little money saved up I want to try real estate because my dad was in it for a while..although not super secuessful ..i can still get a head start because he does have some very valuable experiences that he learned from his work and from other realtors

and go from there….. maybe when im 30 and have more money saved ill start my own business or invest in stocks etc…
my ultimate goal is to have a very good passive income (financial freedom) so i can travel…play music etc etc

even when im doing all this…im still going to continue to play music to see where that takes me

any advice ..suggestions ?

John answers:

Investments are all risks and you can never say if you will have a steady passive income. You never put money into something and then it grows according to your goals, plans and desires. Mind you, goals and plans fail even for the well prepared.

You have to put your whole self into investments, you have to watch the places where you put your money. If you will be a salesperson in real estate, remember that you don’t have a fixed salary there, you earn thru commissions. So you really have to decide which ones you will pursue. But of course follow where your heart is…sometimes they say money follows.

Http://www.real-estate-investing.com

Michael asks…

What does the Financial bailout the new powers it gives to the federal reserve and this have in common?

Forclosure crises is made up excuse, for 125 billion you could pay off every foreclosed loan and every loan three months delinquent in the whole country written in the last three years

Did McVeigh
really die? The Oklahoma City Bombing
Connection to
the WTC Attack

Pentagon Report Reveals Multiple
Blasts in Oklahoma City Bombing
According to the March 20, 1996 issue of Strategic Investment newsletter, a classified Pentagon study confirms that the Oklahoma bombing was caused by more than one bomb. A classified report prepared by two independent Pentagon experts has concluded that the destruction of the federal building in Oklahoma City in April 1995 was caused by five separate bombs. The two experts reached the same conclusion for the same technical reasons. Sources close to the Pentagon study are reported to have said that Timothy McVeigh did play a role in the bombing but peripherally, as a “useful idiot.”
We reported in Freedom Network News at the time that seismograph readouts at the University of Oklahoma indicated more than one blast impulse. Independent ordnance experts, including a Navy Commander, unanimously agreed that a car-bomb with low intensity fertilizer explosives could not have inflicted such extensive damage to the building and that it was highly likely that high-intensity explosives had been wired directly to the columns. Our suspicion then as now is that it was an “inside job.” But by whom is the mystery. Strategic Investment reports that the multiple bombings had a Middle Eastern “signature.” Others find the whole business to be extremely fishy because of the fact that no ATF or FBI agents were in their offices at the time of the blast [about 9:05 a.m.] — and that evidence pertaining to both Waco and Mena had been stored there.

— Strategic Investment, 1217 St. Paul St., Baltimore, MD 21202-4799.

From Freedom Network News (June/July 1996, pages 5-6), the newsletter of ISIL, the International Society for Individual Liberty, 1800 Market Street, San Francisco, California 94102, tel: (415) 864-0952, fax: (415) 864-7506

——————————————————————————–

See also:

Oklahoma City: Two Blasts and Strange Facts

William F. Jasper: Multiple Blasts: More Evidence

——————————————————————————–

America’s Reichstag Fire
On 1997-06-13 Timothy McVeigh was sentenced to death for the bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma City (dead men tell no tales). The “useful idiot” has indeed turned out to be useful, effectively deflecting attention from the real perpetrators of this crime.
The Oklahoma City bombing was America’s equivalent of the 1933 Reichstag Fire.

A fire destroyed the Reichstag Building on February 27, 1933. Hitler blamed the fire on the Communists. The fire symbolically destroyed the only remaining institution capable of placing reins on Hitler’s grab for dictatorial power. Although the case is still somewhat disputed, the fire was very likely instigated by the Nazis and blamed on a Dutch Communist who had committed arson, Marinus van der Lubbe. There was no sign whatsoever of a revolution, but van der Lubbe gave the Nazis the excuse they needed and the pretext for new emergency measures [the Ermächtigungsgesetz, enacted on 1933-03-24]. — The First Steps Leading to the “Final Solution” [link expired]
Timothy McVeigh is America’s version of Marinus van der Lubbe (who was tried by the Nazis, found guilty and executed). On 1995-04-23, only four days after the bombing, with public outrage still at its height, President Clinton signed into law the so-called Counter-Terrorism Bill.

Future historians may write:

Several bombs destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995. President Clinton blamed the bombing on domestic right-wing terrorists. The bombing destroyed the records of the 1993 massacre of the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas, and also records relating to Mena. Although the case is still somewhat disputed, the bombing was very likely instigated by a secret criminal organization parasitic upon the U.S. government and blamed on a member of a right-wing militia, Timothy McVeigh, who was known to be sympathetic to violent resistance to the federal government. There was no sign whatsoever of a revolution, but McVeigh gave the U.S. government the excuse it needed and the pretext for new emergency measures, the Counter-Terrorism Bill.
Again from The First Steps Leading to the “Final Solution:

Hitler induced a confused and frightened Hindenburg to sign a decree euphemistically called, ‘For the Protection of the People and State,’ suspending all of the basic rights of citizens and imposing the death sentence for arson, sabotage, resistance to the decree, and disturbances to public order. Arrests could be made on suspicion, and people could be sentenced to prison without trial or the right of counsel. The suspe

John answers:

Deception.

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